Healthcare, Vol. 11, Pages 1513: Pelvic Organ Prolapse Syndrome and Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Update: What’s New?

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Healthcare, Vol. 11, Pages 1513: Pelvic Organ Prolapse Syndrome and Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Update: What’s New?

Healthcare doi: 10.3390/healthcare11101513

Authors:
Gaetano Maria Munno
Marco La Verde
Davide Lettieri
Roberta Nicoletti
Maria Nunziata
Diego Domenico Fasulo
Maria Giovanna Vastarella
Marika Pennacchio
Gaetano Scalzone
Gorizio Pieretti
Nicola Fortunato
Fulvio De Simone
Gaetano Riemma
Marco Torella

(1) Background: This narrative review aimed to analyze the epidemiological, clinical, surgical, prognostic, and instrumental aspects of the link between pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), collecting the most recent evidence from the scientific literature. (2) Methods: We matched the terms “pelvic organ prolapse” (POP) and “lower urinary tract symptoms” (LUTS) on the following databases: Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, Google scholar, and Cochrane. We excluded case reports, systematic reviews, articles published in a language other than English, and studies focusing only on a surgical technique. (3) Results: There is a link between POP and LUTS. Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) would increase variation in bladder structure and function, which could lead to an overactive bladder (OAB). There is no connection between the POP stage and LUTS. Prolapse surgery could modify the symptoms of OAB with improvement or healing. Post-surgical predictive factors of non-improvement of OAB or de novo onset include high BMI, neurological pathologies, age > 65 years, and the severity of symptoms; predictors of emptying disorders are neurological pathologies, BOO, perineal dysfunctions, severity of pre-surgery symptoms, and severe anterior prolapse. Urodynamics should be performed on a specific subset of patients (i.e., stress urinary incontinence, correct surgery planning), (4) Conclusions: Correction of prolapse is the primary treatment for detrusor underactivity and for patients with both POP and OAB.

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