Foods, Vol. 12, Pages 2080: Encapsulation of Menthol and Luteolin Using Hydrocolloids as Wall Material to Formulate Instant Aromatic Beverages

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Foods, Vol. 12, Pages 2080: Encapsulation of Menthol and Luteolin Using Hydrocolloids as Wall Material to Formulate Instant Aromatic Beverages

Foods doi: 10.3390/foods12102080

Authors:
Laura Sofía Mora-Flórez
Daniel Cabrera-Rodríguez
María Hernández-Carrión

Aromatic plants represent about 0.7% of all medicinal plants. The most common are peppermint (main active ingredient: menthol) and chamomile (main active ingredient: luteolin), which are usually consumed in “tea bags” to make infusions or herbal teas. In this study, menthol and luteolin encapsulates using different hydrocolloids were obtained to replace the conventional preparation of these beverages. Encapsulation was carried out by feeding an infusion of peppermint and chamomile (83% aqueous phase = 75% water − 8% herbs in equal parts, and 17% dissolved solids = wall material in 2:1 ratio) into a spray dryer (180 °C-4 mL/min). A factorial experimental design was used to evaluate the effect of wall material on morphology (circularity and Feret’s diameter) and texture properties of the powders using image analysis. Four formulations using different hydrocolloids were evaluated: (F1) maltodextrin-sodium caseinate (10 wt%), (F2) maltodextrin-soy protein (10 wt%), (F3) maltodextrin-sodium caseinate (15 wt%), and (F4) maltodextrin-soy protein (15 wt%). The moisture, solubility, bulk density, and bioavailability of menthol in the capsules were determined. The results showed that F1 and F2 presented the best combination of powder properties: higher circularity (0.927 ± 0.012, 0.926 ± 0.011), lower moisture (2.69 ± 0.53, 2.71 ± 0.21), adequate solubility (97.73 ± 0.76, 98.01 ± 0.50), and best texture properties. Those suggest the potential of these powders not only as an easy-to-consume and ecofriendly instant aromatic beverage but also as a functional one.

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