Coatings, Vol. 13, Pages 964: Effect of Heat Treatment on the Passive Film and Depassivation Behavior of Cr-Bearing Steel Reinforcement in an Alkaline Environment

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Coatings, Vol. 13, Pages 964: Effect of Heat Treatment on the Passive Film and Depassivation Behavior of Cr-Bearing Steel Reinforcement in an Alkaline Environment

Coatings doi: 10.3390/coatings13050964

Authors:
Yuwan Tian
Cheng Wen
Xiaohui Xi
Deyue Yang
Peichang Deng

Using Cr-bearing low-alloy steel is an effective preventive measure for marine structures, as it offers superior corrosion resistance when compared to plain carbon steel. However, it remains unclear how quenching and tempering heat treatment, which is commonly applied to steel reinforcement in some specific environments to improve its mechanical properties, affects its corrosion resistance. In the present work, the impact of heat treatment on the passive film and depassivation behavior of the 0.2C-1.4Mn-0.6Si-5Cr steel are studied. The results reveal that quenching and tempering result in grain refinement of the Cr-bearing steel, which increases its hardness. However, this refinement causes significant degradation in its corrosion resistance. The critical [Cl−]/[OH−] ratio after quenching and tempering is determined to be approximately 6.6 times lower than that after normalization, and the corrosion rate is 1.6 times higher. After quenching and tempering, the passive film predominantly comprises iron oxides and hydroxides, with relatively high water content and defect density. Additionally, the FeII/FeIII ratio and film resistance are relatively low. In comparison, after normalization, the steel exhibits high corrosion resistance, with the passive film formed offering the highest level of protection.

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