Agronomy, Vol. 13, Pages 1425: Molecular Mechanism of Exogenous Selenium Affecting the Nutritional Quality, Species and Content of Organic Selenium in Mustard

Agronomy, Vol. 13, Pages 1425: Molecular Mechanism of Exogenous Selenium Affecting the Nutritional Quality, Species and Content of Organic Selenium in Mustard

Agronomy doi: 10.3390/agronomy13051425

Authors:
Linling Li
Shuai Wu
Shiyan Wang
Xinyu Shi
Shuiyuan Cheng
Hua Cheng

It is an essential method for healthy Selenium (Se) supplementation to convert exogenous Se into organic Se via crops. Brassica juncea (L.) Czern (leaf mustard) was employed as plant material in this investigation and was treated with sodium selenite (Na2SeO3). Its physiological indicators, nutritional quality, antioxidant enzyme activity, total Se content, and Se morphology were all evaluated. The absorption, transportation, and transformation mechanisms of Se in mustard were studied using transcriptome data. The results revealed that low concentration of Se treatment promoted the growth of mustard, while high concentration Se treatment inhibited it. The concentration of 10 mg/L Na2SeO3 treatment had the best growth parameters for mustard. Compared to the control group, the content of vitamin C (Vc) and anthocyanins in the treatment group increased to varying degrees, while the content of flavonoids, total phenols, soluble sugar, and soluble protein increased first and then decreased. Five Se forms, Se (IV), Se (VI), selenocystine(SeCys2), selenomethionine (SeMet), and methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), were detected in the Na2SeO3 treatment group, with organic Se accounting for over 95%. Na2SeO3 treatment can significantly reduce the accumulation of ROS in mustard plants and enhance their stress resistance. Transcriptome data and metabolite association analysis showed that PHO1-H8 promoted the absorption of Na2SeO3 by mustard roots, while SULTR3;3 and SULTR4;1 promoted the transport of Se from roots to the aboveground portion and chloroplasts. Se in mustard was transformed into SeMet, SeCys, MeSeCys, and selenoprotein through the action of genes such as APS, APR, and SEP1, and stored in plant leaves.

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